Speeds and performance

Factors That Affect the Performance of Broadband

When connected on a service with (for example) a 100 Mbps interface speed, you should not expect that the actual achievable download speed will be 100 Mbps for most content on the internet!

Some of the most important external factors that affect the actual speed include the capacity of, current usage of, and data rate of:

  • The destination server which you are accessing
  • The national and global Internet Transit links between NuSkope and its providers and the destination server
  • The number of individual end users using the service on the NuSkope network, or the number of users accessing the destination.
  • All the hardware used to connect you to the destination server

Additionally your local network may have technical factors that may affect the performance, they include:

  • The hardware that you use to terminate your broadband connection; for example the processing capability of your modem or router.
  • The performance of your home network; for example NuSkope WDSL line speed may be significantly higher than the speeds achievable with home WiFi networks.
  • The limitations imposed by the hardware and software of your computer, smartphone or tablet.
  • The number of individual end users using the service at your premises.

All broadband services should be described in terms of 'theoretical network maximum speeds' - noting that your actual speeds will likley be slower due to a number of factors beyond the control of NuSkope.

 

Wireless (WDSL) Theoretical Maximum Speeds

These are the specified "synch speeds" of the last mile connection to your premises
As stated above these speed statements should not be relied upon when making a purchasing decision, as usage in the real world is unlikely to consistently achieve such speeds.

 

  • 12/2 Mbps - which means that the theoretical peak download speed (from the Internet) is 12 Megabits per second, and the theoretical peak upload speed (to the Internet) is 2 Megabits per second.
  • 12/5 Mbps - which means that the theoretical peak download speed (from the Internet) is 12 Megabits per second, and the theoretical peak upload speed (to the Internet) is 5 Megabits per second.
  • 24/5 Mbps - which means that the theoretical peak download speed (from the Internet) is 24 Megabits per second, and the theoretical peak upload speed (to the Internet) is 5 Megabits per second.
  • 30/5 Mbps - which means that the theoretical peak download speed (from the Internet) is 30 Megabits per second, and the theoretical peak upload speed (to the Internet) is 5 Megabits per second.
  • 50/10 Mbps - which means that the theoretical peak download speed (from the Internet) is 50 Megabits per second, and the theoretical peak upload speed (to the Internet) is 10 Megabits per second.
  • 120/50 Mbps - which means that the theoretical peak download speed (from the Internet) is 120 Megabits per second, and the theoretical peak upload speed (to the Internet) is 50 Megabits per second.
  • 1000/500 Mbps - which means that the theoretical peak download speed (from the Internet) is 1000 Megabits per second, and the theoretical peak upload speed (to the Internet) is 500 Megabits per second.

 

National Broadband Network (NBN) Theoretical Maximum Speeds

These are the specified "synch speeds" of the last mile connection to your premises
As stated above these speed statements should not be relied upon when making a purchasing decision, as usage in the real world is unlikely to consistently achieve such speeds.

  • 12/1 Mbps - which means that the theoretical peak download speed (from the Internet) is 12 Megabits per second, and the theoretical peak upload speed (to the Internet) is 1 Megabit per second.
  • 25/5 Mbps - which means that the theoretical peak download speed (from the Internet) is 25 Megabits per second, and the theoretical peak upload speed (to the Internet) is 5 Megabits per second.
  • 50/20 Mbps - which means that the theoretical peak download speed (from the Internet) is 50 Megabits per second, and the theoretical peak upload speed (to the Internet) is 20 Megabits per second.
  • 100/40 Mbps - which means that the theoretical peak download speed (from the Internet) is 100 Megabits per second, and the theoretical peak upload speed (to the Internet) is 40 Megabits per second.